Weeping Blue Atlas Cedar

Cedrus atlantica ‘Glauca Pedula’

Leaves: Evergreen. 30-40 stiff needles are 1" long and grow in dense clusters off a spur or short twig like a firework. Bluish green to silvery-blue color.

Bark/Twigs: Dark gray furrowed bark. Smoother on younger branches.

Flowers/Fruit: Inconspicuous flowers in spring. A few small pollinating cones appear in the spring, but this variety usually does not produce female cones.

Mature size and shape: Small. 10-15'h x 15-20'w. Weeping form with contorted, twisted limbs that cascade like a waterfall. Each tree is unique depending on how it is trained.

General information/special features: Plant in full sun. Moist, deep rich soil with good drainage is best. Adapts to sandy and clay soils if no standing water is present. Shelter from the wind.

Landscape use and Maintenance: Extremely elegant in form and color. Use as a specimen tree for a focal point. Can be planted under power lines. Slow growing rate. Low maintenance. Difficult to transplant and establish. Must be staked and trained when young to develop a strong leader.

USDA Hardiness Zone: 6-9

Family/Origin: Pinaceae – Pine. Native to the Atlas Mountains in Morocco and Algeria.

Campus use: Rare. Unique specimen.

Incense-cedar

Calocedrus decurrens

Leaves: Evergreen. Small, scaly foliage flattened along stem in groups of 4s. ¼" long on younger twigs, ½" long on older twigs. Leaves overlap each other and lie flat against one another. White lines separate leaves. Leaves spread in two directions to make flattened, spreading fan-like branchlets. Dark green and shiny.

Bark/Twigs: Thick, yellow-brown to cinnamon-red fibrous bark. Deeply and irregularly furrowed and grows in long, fibrous strips.

Flowers/Fruit: Inconspicuous flowers. Cones are ¾" to 1½" long.

Mature size and shape: Large. 30-50’h x 8-10’w. Columnar shape. Somewhat narrow crowned.

General information/special features: Plant in full sun to partial shade. Moist, well-drained soil preferred, but tolerates poor soils. Drought tolerant when older and established. Both foliage and wood give off a pleasant fragrance.

Landscape use and Maintenance: Good evergreen tree. Good for narrower areas due to columnar shape. Slow to medium growing rate. Low maintenance. Somewhat difficult to transplant.

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-8

Family/Origin: Cupressaceae – Cypress. Native to mountainous areas in California, Oregon, and Washington.  Not a true cedar.

Blue Atlas Cedar

Cedrus atlantica ‘Glauca’

Leaves: Evergreen. 30-40 stiff needles are 1" long and grow in dense clusters off a spur or short twig like a firework. Bluish green to silvery-blue color.

Bark/Twigs: Dark gray furrowed bark. Smoother on younger branches.

Flowers/Fruit: Inconspicuous flowers in spring. Releases yellow pollen in the fall. Female cones are 2-3” long by 2” wide and only grow on upper branches. They start out purple-green and turn brown at maturity.

Mature size and shape: Large. 40-60'h x 30-40'w. Pyramidal with slightly weeping limbs. Top flattens with age.

General information/special features: Plant in full sun. Moist, deep rich soil with good drainage is best. Adapts to sandy and clay soils if no standing water is present.

Landscape use and Maintenance: Extremely elegant in form and color. Use as a specimen tree. Plant in a large, open area. Slow growing rate. Low maintenance. Difficult to transplant and establish.

USDA Hardiness Zone: 6-9

Family/Origin: Pinaceae – Pine. Native to the Atlas Mountains in Morocco and Algeria.

Campus use: Common. Beautiful mature grove can be found south of Architecture (Bld 37) and north of Marcia & John Price Art Museum (Bld 35).