Washington Hawthorn

Crataegus phaenopyrum

Leaves: Deciduous. Thin leaves are nearly deltoid or triangular in shape and have 3-5 lobes. They are 1-3" long and  ¾-2¼” wide, with a sharply serrated leaf edge with several small lobes. Dark green color and glossy. Orange to red fall color.

Bark/Twigs: Dark red-green to grayish colored bark. It is shreddy, scaly or sometimes blocky when young. Weakly furrowed, ridged, scaly, and often fluted or knotted when older.  Numerous 1-3" long, slender thorns.

Flowers/Fruit: Flowers are white, ½" diameter, and bloom in small clusters. Blooms early June for 7-10 days.  Fruit a ¼" diameter berry (pome), bright orange-red when mature and glossy. Fruit persists into winter and attracts birds.

Mature size and shape: Medium. 25-30’h x 20-25’w. Broadly oval to rounded shape, dense and thorny tree.

General information/special features: Plant in full sun. Shade intolerant. Fairly tough, drought tolerant and pH adaptable.

Landscape use and Maintenance: Good ornamental tree that can be planted in small groups or as a specimen. Average growing rate. Average maintenance.

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8

Family/Origin: Rosaceae – Rose. Native to much of the eastern U.S.

Campus use: Somewhat uncommon. Can be found northeast of Eyring Chemistry Building (Bld 85).

Lavalle Hawthorn

Crataegus x lavallei

Leaves: Deciduous. Leaves are shiny dark green on top with fine hairs beneath. Leaves are elliptical 2-4” long and ½ as wide with serrations on the upper outside edge. The lower ⅓ to ⅔ of the leaf edge is smooth. Dark, glossy green color in summer. Fall color is red to purple-red or bronze/copper.

Bark/Twigs: Trunk has an interesting exfoliating appearance. Branches have a few stout, thick thorns.

Flowers/Fruit: White flowers have five petals and are ¼” in diameter. Flowers grow in 3” wide clusters. Blooms late spring or early summer (May to June). Fruit is a fairly large ⅝ - ¾" marble-sized berry (pome). Bright orange-red when mature and remain on the tree throughout winter attracting birds.

Mature size and shape: Small to medium.  15-25’h and ⅔ as wide.

Rounded tree with dense branching pattern, especially dense among the smaller branches.

General information/special features: Plant in full sun. Moist, well-drained soil is best. Does fairly well in somewhat drier conditions.

Landscape use and Maintenance: Good specimen tree. Can be planted in parkstrips. Slow to medium growing rate. Average maintenance.

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-7

Family/Origin: Rosaceae – Rose. A hybrid of C. crusgalli and probably C. pubescens.

Campus use: Common. Can be found on southeast part of President's Circle or south of University Bookstore (Bld 67). The tree in President’s Circle is on the Utah Big Tree Registry.

English Hawthorn

Crataegus laevigata

Leaves: Deciduous. Leaves are moderate to deeply lobed with 3-5 lobes and frequently irregularly lobed. 1-2” long and  ⅔ as wide.  Leaves have large teeth and serrated leaf edges. Medium to dark green color. Fall color varies from reds to orange, usually brown.

Bark/Twigs: Trunk looks like a bundle of stems. Trunk is fluted and has interesting, grey-brown peeling bark.  1" long thorns periodically appear on small twigs, but fall off of larger branches.

Flowers/Fruit: Flowers are red to pale pink, sometimes white, in small 1-2” clusters. Flowers are ¼” in diameter and have five petals. Blooms late spring to early summer (May-June). Red to orange, pea-sized fruits persist through the winter and attract birds.

Mature size and shape: Medium small. 15-25’h by ⅔ as wide. Rounded to spreading shape.

General information/special features: Plant in full sun to partial shade. Moist, well-drained soil is best. Does fairly well in somewhat drier conditions and can be drought tolerant after established.

Landscape use and Maintenance: Makes a nice tree for smaller areas. This small, pollution tolerant tree is a good choice for the urban landscape. Average growing rate. Average maintenance.

USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8

Family/Origin: Rosaceae – Rose. Native to Europe and northern Africa.  Also called C. oxyacantha.

Campus use: Somewhat common. Can be found in President’s Circle or south of the Park Building (Bld 1).

Cockspur Hawthorn

Crataegus crus-galli

Leaves: Deciduous. Leaves are 1-4" long and  ½ -1 ½ ” wide, with a finely serrated leaf edge and oval shape with a blunt tip. They are dark green in color and glossy. Redish-purple fall color.

Bark/Twigs: Red-brown to grayish colored bark. It is scaly or sometimes blocky when young. Weakly furrowed, ridged, scaly, and often fluted or knotted when older.  Numerous 1-3" long, slender thorns. Plant thornless variety inermis.

Flowers/Fruit: Flowers are white, ½" diameter, and bloom in small clusters. Blooms early June for 7-10 days.  Fruit a ¼- ½ " diameter berry (pome), bright orange-red to red-purple when mature. Fruit persists into winter and attracts birds.

Mature size and shape: Small. 15-25’h x 10-20’w. Broadly oval to rounded shape, dense and thorny tree. Becomes flat-topped with age.

General information/special features: Plant in full sun. Shade intolerant. Fairly tough, drought and salt tolerant and pH adaptable.

Landscape use and Maintenance: Nice ornamental tree that can be planted in small groups or as a specimen. Average growing rate. Average maintenance. Plant thornless varieties if available.

USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-7

Family/Origin: Rosaceae – Rose. Native to much of the eastern U.S.

Campus use: Somewhat uncommon. Can be found south of the Union Building (Bld 53).